The following page is for information only. Do not give medications unless prescribed by a vet for that dog.

Eggs are easy to detect in dogs with heavy infestation. Lighter infestations may be harder to detect depending on the cycle of the worm. Some medications kill several types of worms, so when the vet finds one type of worm, other types that were undetected may also be killed. Tapeworms are killed by fewer medications and they are harder to detect. This is why it is so important to watch for them in your foster dog’s feces. You must watch for several days to see the segments at the right time of the worm’s cycle.

The monthly application of Advantage Multi® controls fleas, whipworms, hookworms, roundworms and heartworms. If the dog does not already have tapeworms, they are generally not a future issue as the fleas are controlled.

Tapeworms

A tapeworm is a long, white segmented worm. Tapeworms live in a dog’s digestive tract. The head embeds itself into the lining and the rest of the worm trails downstream. As new segments of the worm are made near the head, segments at the end of the worm break off. These segments contain egg packets. The segments exit the dog’s body with the feces and you can see them. They look like little pieces of rice or cucumber seeds and are active until they dry out. Active segments around your dog’s anus may cause the dog to lick or scoot on the floor. You may also see what looks like dried pieces of rice around the dog’s anus. Dogs usually get tapeworms from fleas. Sometimes infections can occur from eating infected rodents. Tapeworm eggs can be found during the fecal exam done by our vet. However, depending on when the segments break off, eggs may not be found with only one fecal exam. This is why it is very important to observe the feces of your foster dog and also watch for signs of worms around the dog’s anus. It is very rare for humans to become infected with the type of tapeworms in dogs.

Roundworms

Roundworms are long, white worms that look like strands of spaghetti. This is a parasitic infection frequently found in puppies and dogs. Estimates are that 50% of all puppies and 20% of all dogs are infected. The worms irritate the digestive tract and can cause malnutrition, lethargy, loss of appetite, slightly enlarged belly, blockage and diarrhea. Coiled up roundworms can be seen in material your dog vomits or in the feces. The common ways dogs are infected are by consuming an animal with roundworms (such as a rodent), by consuming eggs in the soil (or in another dog’s feces), nursing when the mom is infected and born from an infected mom. The best detection for roundworms is through a fecal exam at your vet. All MAGRR dogs receive a fecal exam during intake. When you pick up your new foster, you may need to give a follow-up pill to finish treatment. It is a good idea to remove and dispose of your foster dog’s feces immediately after they go for the first few days that they are at your house.

Hookworms

Hookworms are small parasites that “chew” their way into the intestinal wall, where they attach and feed on blood. Symptoms can include anemia, weight loss, lethargy, bloody diarrhea and itching from burrowing into the skin. The common ways dogs are infected are through the mouth by eating or smelling other dog’s feces, through the skin (such as on the feet when they step in infected dirt and feces), from the mother through the placenta and from the mother’s milk. Hookworms are very small, so you cannot see them through the fecal material. They are diagnosed by examining a stool sample with a microscope when the vet does a fecal exam. All MAGRR dogs receive a fecal exam during intake. When you pick up your new foster, you may need to give a follow-up pill to finish treatment. It is a good idea to remove and dispose of your foster dog’s feces immediately after they go for the first few days they are at your house.

Whipworms

These worms lie coiled within the wall and lining of the large intestine and have a whip-like shape. In most cases dogs do not have any symptoms, but with heavy infections they may have diarrhea with blood in it. When the intestine is inflamed, it will produce a lot of mucus — you may also see this in the feces. Dogs are infected with whipworms by ingesting something with whipworm eggs in it (such as contaminated water or feces). The type of whipworms found in dogs does not live in humans. The best detection of whipworms is through a fecal exam at the vet. All MAGRR dogs receive a fecal exam during intake. When you pick up your new foster, you may need to give a follow-up pill to finish treatment. It is a good idea to remove and dispose of your foster dog’s feces immediately after they go for the first few days they are at your house.